Trifonic: Editing Beats – Part 2

30 Dec

Brian continues his discussion on drum programming in this video. He demonstrates Trifonic’s method for time-stretching to create special effects and glitchy awesomeness.

Make sure to check out Part 1 if you haven’t already.

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  • bumler

    thnx for sharing!
    Nice to see how you push logic to the limits.
    very inspiring!

  • bumler

    thnx for sharing!
    Nice to see how you push logic to the limits.
    very inspiring!

  • Beldragim

    Nice tricks! I can't wait for more :)

  • Beldragim

    Nice tricks! I can't wait for more :)

  • Bronto Scorpio

    Very great tutorials! I would like to see a bassline tutorial too. I really like the bassline in your track “parks on fire”!

  • Bronto Scorpio

    Very great tutorials! I would like to see a bassline tutorial too. I really like the bassline in your track “parks on fire”!

  • http://twitter.com/bolig seth ferris

    i really appreciate that these tutorials focus on manual design rather than relying on automation to glitch out the beats for you. it allows you think about how you would want to design your beats from the ground up and thus allows you to use plug ins more effectively later. i also appreciate the use of amen break despite its familiarity. using that break demystifies the work you are doing since we have all heard it so many times and its clear how you are manipulating it. thanks for sharing your techniques, further proof that if you're creative and confident sharing your methods isn't scary at all!

  • http://twitter.com/bolig seth ferris

    i really appreciate that these tutorials focus on manual design rather than relying on automation to glitch out the beats for you. it allows you think about how you would want to design your beats from the ground up and thus allows you to use plug ins more effectively later. i also appreciate the use of amen break despite its familiarity. using that break demystifies the work you are doing since we have all heard it so many times and its clear how you are manipulating it. thanks for sharing your techniques, further proof that if you're creative and confident sharing your methods isn't scary at all!

  • gigazaga

    Love your no-nonsense approach! These techniques would work in pretty much any DAW.

  • gigazaga

    Love your no-nonsense approach! These techniques would work in pretty much any DAW.

  • http://www.ramp-music.net/ Irfon-Kim Ahmad

    Fantastic tutorials. Most of this is stuff I've done myself before, but the videos are worth it for the time-saving shortcuts alone! You have no idea how much of this stuff I'd do manually piece by piece without having thought to select a pile of regions (for gating, for example), or did with just the mouse and didn't realize the keyboard shortcuts that would make life easier. (I don't know if I've *ever* pressed Option in Logic before, for example, and to make slices I was setting the time division value and moving forward by divisions then hitting the cut key. Eek!)

    Anyway, thanks a lot, and this was great stuff.

    Also, as people have pointed out, it's nice to see that the simple techniques scale to the massive sound that you folks achieve. It makes it seem so much more accessible!

  • Maize

    Fantastic tutorials. Most of this is stuff I've done myself before, but the videos are worth it for the time-saving shortcuts alone! You have no idea how much of this stuff I'd do manually piece by piece without having thought to select a pile of regions (for gating, for example), or did with just the mouse and didn't realize the keyboard shortcuts that would make life easier. (I don't know if I've *ever* pressed Option in Logic before, for example, and to make slices I was setting the time division value and moving forward by divisions then hitting the cut key. Eek!)

    Anyway, thanks a lot, and this was great stuff.

    Also, as people have pointed out, it's nice to see that the simple techniques scale to the massive sound that you folks achieve. It makes it seem so much more accessible!

  • David Hollingshead

    Kind of takes away from the mystery of it but it's cool to see how they do it.

  • David Hollingshead

    Kind of takes away from the mystery of it but it's cool to see how they do it.

  • briantrifon

    Cool! I'm glad you enjoyed the video. Thanks for the topic suggestions, I'll keep them in mind.

  • briantrifon

    Cool! I'm glad you enjoyed the video. Thanks for the topic suggestions, I'll keep them in mind.

  • briantrifon

    Thanks! I'm planning to show a lot of things in Logic, but also some techniques in Ableton Live and possibly Pro Tools as well. Each tool has its strengths and quirks so we end up using a few different daw's in the studio

  • briantrifon

    Thanks! I'm planning to show a lot of things in Logic, but also some techniques in Ableton Live and possibly Pro Tools as well. Each tool has its strengths and quirks so we end up using a few different daw's in the studio

  • briantrifon

    Thanks Seth! I think understanding the manual way to do things also helps you extract better results from the available automated tools as well. We use NI Reaktor, and other automated programs to do some of the tweaky sounds in conjunction with the manual chop/copy methods, but even the Reaktor generated edits often get manually chopped/processed so that they fit better in the context. Bottom line it is good to know all the various methods of executing a technique….. “because knowing is half the battle” :)

  • briantrifon

    Thanks Seth! I think understanding the manual way to do things also helps you extract better results from the available automated tools as well. We use NI Reaktor, and other automated programs to do some of the tweaky sounds in conjunction with the manual chop/copy methods, but even the Reaktor generated edits often get manually chopped/processed so that they fit better in the context. Bottom line it is good to know all the various methods of executing a technique….. “because knowing is half the battle” :)

  • briantrifon

    cool! That is the plan. I don't want to be overly DAW focused…I'm trying to keep things concept oriented, and over time I'll show some things in Ableton Live and possibly others as well.

  • briantrifon

    cool! That is the plan. I don't want to be overly DAW focused…I'm trying to keep things concept oriented, and over time I'll show some things in Ableton Live and possibly others as well.

  • briantrifon

    Thanks for the comment. Fortunately the majority of cool sounds and techniques are based on simple ideas and concepts. The hard part is getting everything to work together, express emotion and musically create something meaningful :)

  • briantrifon

    Thanks for the comment. Fortunately the majority of cool sounds and techniques are based on simple ideas and concepts. The hard part is getting everything to work together, express emotion and musically create something meaningful :)

  • http://fahrgeschaeft.com/ Laurent

    Yes I agree with everyone above … Great way to present things!

    Just 3 questions regarding the cut-up process.

    - What you do in the first cutting part is really to set every hit to a strict beat division ?
    - In the sampler window have you set the “snap edits to zero crossing” ?
    - and you don't use fade ins/outs even one the longer regions ? Is this because the tempo is too fast ?

    L.

  • http://fahrgeschaeft.com/ Laurent

    Yes I agree with everyone above … Great way to present things!

    Just 3 questions regarding the cut-up process.

    - What you do in the first cutting part is really to set every hit to a strict beat division ?
    - In the sampler window have you set the “snap edits to zero crossing” ?
    - and you don't use fade ins/outs even one the longer regions ? Is this because the tempo is too fast ?

    L.

  • briantrifon

    Yeah I cut the loop at the strict beat division and then adjust the start point of each region … that puts the correct start point right on the beat division. Definitely turn off “snap edits to zero crossing” in the sample editor. I don't use fade outs unless I hear a click and it bothers me. If I don't hear a click or if the click sounds good I don't do a fade out. There usually isn't a need for a fade in, because in the case of percussion sounds, the transient is very punchy anyway and if it clicks it often brings out the transient even more. It depends on the material though.

  • briantrifon

    Yeah I cut the loop at the strict beat division and then adjust the start point of each region … that puts the correct start point right on the beat division. Definitely turn off “snap edits to zero crossing” in the sample editor. I don't use fade outs unless I hear a click and it bothers me. If I don't hear a click or if the click sounds good I don't do a fade out. There usually isn't a need for a fade in, because in the case of percussion sounds, the transient is very punchy anyway and if it clicks it often brings out the transient even more. It depends on the material though.

  • monkdream

    Hello Brain.

    Thanks a lot for your answers. This helps a lot!

    It's exactly like Peter Kirn writes on his blogs when posting about your site :”Part of what makes this tutorial compelling is that the duo has a distinctive musical identity, rather than being the anonymous, all-knowing voice music tech instructors had tried to be in the past”

    I really hope you keep on posting here.

    L.

  • monkdream

    Hello Brian.

    Thanks a lot for your answers. This helps a lot!

    It's exactly like Peter Kirn writes on his blogs when posting about your site :”Part of what makes this tutorial compelling is that the duo has a distinctive musical identity, rather than being the anonymous, all-knowing voice music tech instructors had tried to be in the past”

    I really hope you keep on posting here.

    L.

  • http://twitter.com/Morphido Morphido

    All is being VERY interesting! Really! Only adding any idea, I would like to know any technic or inspirational factor for your acoustic parts, that guitars are beautiful!
    Trifonic and Emergence is becoming my best example of modern electronic music experience! :)

    Cheers,
    morphido

  • http://twitter.com/Morphido Morphido

    All is being VERY interesting! Really! Only adding any idea, I would like to know any technic or inspirational factor for your acoustic parts, that guitars are beautiful!
    Trifonic and Emergence is becoming my best example of modern electronic music experience! :)

    Cheers,
    morphido